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  • *Panel Call for Papers 3: Smart Governance and Digital Solutions for Sustainable Development in the Post-Pandemic Era

    Smart Governance and Digital Solutions for Sustainable Development in the Post-Pandemic EraFull Paper Deadline: November 1, 2022Yanliu Lin,Utrecht University, The NetherlandsEmail: y.lin@uu.nlHuaxiong Jiang,Beijing Normal University, Beijing, ChinaEmail: huaxiong.jiang@bnu.edu.cn*Please also CC aapaoffice@163.comwhen submitting to this panel.COVID-19 has caused a range of city challenges, which presents chances for policy makers and urban leaders to learn the right lessons from this crisis to build long-range socioeconomic and environmental resilience against future disasters (Kumar et al., 2020). Policy makers and practitioners in many countries have increasingly used a wide range of digital platforms and big data techniques to support public administration, e-participation, and governance processes to address sustainable challenges. Smart governance, as an innovative way of institutional arrangement, has been consistently argued to provide the potential to respond to the crisis and help recover from the crisis (Jiang et al., 2021). Here, smart governance indicates “the process of utilizing modern technologies and ICT to ensure a collaborative, transparent, participatory, communication-based and sustainable environment for citizens and governments” (İkizer, 2022). It is usually related to improving the participatory and collaborative processes and change the ways public services and policies are innovatively offered to the public (Whitelaw et al., 2020).In Chicago, for instance, local government applied anonymized cellphone data to examine travel pathways and patterns, and trace whether people obey the quarantine or self-isolating regulations and rules. In South Korea, Singapore and Middle East, smartphone data was employed to position those who have close contacts with confirmed cases and map their movements for further policy interventions. In Indian cities, operational integrated command and control centers served as quasi-war rooms to administer contact tracing activities, offer essential services, provide emergency alert information, and make decisions for COVID response. In Western countries, apps and digital platforms have been widely used to assist e-participation and collaborative governance processes. The pandemic indicated that a large diversity of smart governance applications and capabilities already exist across cities all over the world.As we begin to slowly realize that we might have to live with it, it is time to re-think how we can plan for sustainable development in the post-pandemic era.1)What has been changed in our society and what are their impacts on socioeconomic and environmental systems?2)What are the new challenges of urban governance and public administration in the pandemic and post-pandemic era?3)What kinds of digital platforms and innovative solutions are applied to address these challenges?4)To which extent can they lead to improved or smart governance for crisis management and sustainable transition?5)What could be the new policies, strategies, or solutions for long-term sustainable development?This panel intends to gather analyses, perspectives, and case studies that can be applied to facilitate the development and implementation of more effective and resilient cities in post-COVID-19 era. High-quality original studies and review articles on smart governance modes, smart governance policies, and novel applications in different contexts are very welcome.Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:1. Changes in our cities and society, such as living style, in the post-pandemic era;2. Innovative governance or solutions for coping the crisis and challenges in the pandemic and post-pandemic era;3. Usage of digital platforms (e.g., public participatory platforms, planning support tools, social media, apps, and smart platforms) for participation, collaboration and management in urban transformation, water governance, green solutions, shared mobility, and other domains;4. Big data techniques in urban analysis and prediction for crisis management and sustainable development;5. SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis for smart governance in response to COVID impacts and sustainable development;6. New policies, strategies, or smart governance solutions for long-term sustainable development .ReferencesJiang, H., Witte, P. and Geertman, S., 2021. Smart Governance and COVID-19 Control in Wuhan, China. In: SCM Geertman, C Pettit, R Goodspeed, A Staffans (eds) Urban Informatics and Future Cities (pp. 17-32). Springer, Cham.Kumar, A., Gupta, P.K. and Srivastava, A., 2020. A review of modern technologies for tackling COVID-19 pandemic. Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research Reviews, 14(4), pp.569-573.Pego, AC. (2021). Smart cities, citizen welfare, and the implementation of sustainable development goals (pp. 22-44). IGI Global.Lin, Y. L. (2022) Rethinking collaborative planning in China: Does the communicative or agonistic planning theory matter? Planning Theory. DOI: 10.1177/14730952221122283Lin, Y. L. (2022) Social media for collaborative planning: A typology of support functions and challenges. Cities, 125, 103641.Lin, Y. L. and Benneker, K. (2022) Assessing collaborative planning and the added value of planning support apps in The Netherlands. Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, 49(2), 391-410.Lin, Y. L. and Kant, S. (2021) Social media for citizen participation: Contexts, empowerment and inclusion. Sustainability, 13(12), 6635.Whitelaw, S., Mamas, M. A., Topol, E., Van Spall, H. G. (2020). Applications of digital technology in COVID-19 pandemic planning and response. The Lancet Digital Health, 2(8), e435-e440.

    2022.10.20
  • *Panel Call for Papers 2: Improving policy analysis and performance governance through outcome- oriented approaches to “localize” the SDG agenda

    Improvingpolicyanalysisandperformancegovernancethroughoutcome-orientedapproachesto“localize”theSDG agendaCarmineBianchi1i(correspondingpanelist);JiannanWu2ii;JeremyHall3iiiB.;GuyPeters4iv;MusaAli5vSuper-wickedproblems:theneedforpolicyinnovationIn the last two decades, multiple criseshavebeenthreateningsocietalsustainability. Socialconflicts,terrorism, poverty, natural catastrophes, marginalization, resource scarcity, economicdownturns, and pandemicdiseasesareachallengeforsocietalequilibrium.“Superwicked” problems(Levinetal.,2012) gradually emerge locally to explode globally, and vice versa. Global and local problems are more intertwined than ever. The risingblurrinessofthesystems whereindividualstakeholdersoperateprovidesamajorsourceofinterconnectednessacross organizationsandregions, whichoriginateperformanceinstability. Thisrequiresproperkeysand methodsforrobustpolicydesignandimplementation.Tofosterconsistencyonalocal, regional, national, andtransnationallevel, andoverdifferenttime horizons to deal with such problems, scalabilityandstakeholdercollaborationareneededconditions.“Superwicked” problemsarecharacterizedbyintrinsicdynamiccomplexity, duetomulti-level,multi-actor, andmulti-sectoralchallenges(Head Alford, 2013; Bianchi, 2021). Also, majordelays andperceptiondistortionsmayoccurbetweentheiridentificationandasystematicanalysisoftheir causes, leadingto consistent policy implementation. Indeed, in designing interventions, policymakersshouldtakeintoconsiderationtheinconsistenciesofpoliciesaimedattacklingproblemsintheshort runandinnarrowdomains, sincetheymaytriggerpath-dependentprocessesthatwouldinertially unfoldunintendedoutcomes, overtimeandspace(Levinetal., 2012).Framingthedynamiccomplexitybehindcommunityoutcomesinsuchsettingsrequirespolicy innovation(Sorensen Torfing, 2017, 828). Thisimpliestheinvolvementofstakeholdersfrom differentgovernancelayersinpursuingacommonsharedviewofthefeedbackstructureunderlying the observed system performance. To enhance stakeholder learning processes, mutualaccountability,shared knowledge, and trust, using innovative outcome-based performancegovernancemethodsmay playacrucialrole. Infact, itmayenablemodelers/facilitatorsintheplanningprocesstofosterstakeholdercollaborationandlearning(Sorensen Torfing, 2012, 8) byalsoenactingfeedforward mechanismsthroughpolicyimplementation(Bianchi, 2021; 2022; Otley, 1999). Tothisend,using “hybrid” performanceregimes(DouglasandAnsell, 2021, p. 956) inthecontextofcollaborative platforms(AnsellandGash, 2018, p. 20) mayenhancelearningforumsinnetworkperformance governance.Adoptingpoliciesbasedonaproactivesystemviewallowsstakeholderstodiscernhowinertial changes can be fosteredthroughearlierdecisions, “havingbothaconstrainingor‘lock-in’ effectand anopportunity-enhancingeffect” (Bardach, 2008, p. 348).To detect the inertial changes underminingthe socio-economic and biological system structurebehindsuchproblems, stakeholdersshouldbridgeshortandlong-termperspectives, throughrobustpolicylogicsthatchallengethedominantpublic valuesinasociety(Osborne, 2010, 418-419) andenhanceasustainableholistictransition(Folkeet al, 2003, p. 353; Stokols, 2013).Implementingthisapproachmajorpolicyinnovationentailsframingcontextsassystemspopulated by people and institutions, characterized by culture, goals, and perceptions. Theseareprimarycauses ofsocietalbehaviorwhichimpactslocalareaperformanceonbothanecologicalandasocio-economicdimension. Consequently, sustainablestructuralchangesinacityshouldnotbebounded toonlyphysicalmutationsofitsurbaninfrastructure. Theyare, instead, anoutcomeofasystemic changethatgoesbeyondasumofinvestments, engineering, andarchitecturalprojectsforurban regeneration, ortheadoptionandenforcementofnewregulations.LocalizingSDGs:usingoutcome-orientedapproachesinperformancegovernancetoimprovepolicyanalysis.Anefforttowardsaddressingtherisingconcernsonthedescribedsuper-wickedproblemshasbeen made by theUnitedNations(UN) throughth 2030 SustainableDevelopmentGoals(SDG) Agenda.The17 SDGsandrelated169 targetsstrivetoencourageallnationstotacklethesesuper-wicked problemsbystimulatingeconomicgrowthandenhancingsocietalneeds(suchaseducation,healthcare,socialwelfare, andemploymentopportunities), andcopingwithecologicalchallenges (suchasclimatechangeandbiodiversityerosionpatterns) (GeneralAssembly, 2015).The main problems in the UN agenda are associated with thedifficultytodetectsystemicconnectionsbetweendifferentSDGsandtherelatedstakeholderswhowouldparticipatethroughcollaborative policiesaimedatachievingthem. Also, theSDGagendadoesnotsuggesthowtheoutcomesrelated todifferentSDGscouldbeaffected, i.e., throughwhatmethodsandatwhatgovernancelevels, final andintermediateoutcomeswouldbeidentified, gauged, andpossiblymonitoredintheshortterm throughproperperformancedrivers. Finally, theSDGagendadoesn’tshedlightonhowtoidentify andgaugethesharedstrategicresourcesatcontextlevel, whichcollaborativepoliciesaimedat affectingtheSDGoutcomeswouldleverage. Also, ensuringconsistencybetweentheplanning processatcontextlevelandtheplanningprocessatorganizationallevelforachievingSDGsmay requireinnovationinperformancegovernance.Sustainabledevelopmentandsocietalresilienceneedamultidisciplinaryapproachandmulti-actor governancesystemsacrosslocal, national, andinternationalboundaries, butalsorequiretheability toadaptandsupportchangewithoutunderminingfutureflexibility(Perryetal., 2018). Thiseffort cannot be conceived as only bounded to only a scientific dimension. Itshouldberathertransposedto apractitioners’ fieldbyinvolvingcommunitystakeholdersthroughinnovativeandconsistentcollaborativeplanningmethods(Ostrometal., 1999; Folkeetal., 2003). Tothisend, thereisaneed tofosterbottom-upinitiatives, byenhancingtheinterestandparticipationincollaborativenetworks by “grassroot” organizations (Smith, 1999; Moore et al., 2007; Foster Louie, 2010), and otherkinds ofinstitutions– e.g.: community-basedorganizations(Provan Milward, 2001), backbone organizations(Kania Kramer, 2011) – asanexpressionofthecivilsocietyparticipativeeffortsto generatecommunitywellbeing.LocalgovernmentparticipationandeffectivenessinlocalizingSDGsdependsonmultilevel governancestructuresindiversenationalsettings(Perryetal., 2021). ThoughtranslatingSDGsinto local contexts is a challenging effort, it is a fundamental step to properly frame them on a global scale,tofosterpolicyanalysis, goalsetting, andjointaccountability(Cashoreetal2019).Thisrequiresendogenizingsuchgoalsconsistentlywiththespecificfeaturesofalocalcontext (country, city, region, set of neighborhoods, etc.), in terms of socio-economic, cultural, andecologicalsystems. Suchfeaturescontributeatthesametimetoshapethe wicked problems detected at the globallevelandprovidearelevantfieldwhereexperimentationpoliciescanbedesignedandimplemented atlocallevel. Therefore, endogenizingSDGsisnotonlyassociatedwiththeneedtocascadesuch goalsfromaglobaltoalocallevelbutalsotounderstandthefactors(e.g.: culture, history,shared strategic resources, institutions) which explain the local causes behind the globalchallengescaptured inthe2030 UNagenda.Global indicatorswouldnotbeapplicableatlocallevelwithoutproperdata, resources, andcapacity,including the use of methodologies enhancing learning in collaborativeplanningandimplementation (Tanetal., 2019). Tothisend, cross-boundaryperformancedialogue(Laihonen Mäntylä, 2017; Moynihan, 2008) mayenhancecollaborativenetworkinginitiativescharacterizedbylong-term collectivepolicydesign, to“triggerandnurturepath-dependentprocessesthatleadtotransformative changeovertime” (Levinetal, 2012, p. 131). Performancedialoguecanact as a fundamental driver ofbehavioralchangeinsocietythatmaycounteractthe“irrationaldiscounting” associatedwithan inclinationtomildlyperceivethenegativefutureoutcomesthatthecurrently– latent, weak, or inconsistent– adoptedpolicieswillgenerateconcerning“wicked” problems(Bianchi, 2022).Also,collaborativenetworkingprovidesapowerfulenginetocopewithoneofthemainchallenges that“super-wicked” problemsimply: decision-makersinasinglepublicsectororganizationdonot controlallthechoicesrequiredtoalleviatetheproblem.ResearchchallengesTheneedtomovetowardslong-termsustainabilityandresiliencethroughasocio-economic,cultural,andecologicaltransitionprovidesabasisforaworkshopaimingatexploringhowenhancedand outcome-orientedperformancegovernanceapproachesmayactasanimportantfactortriggering policyinnovationtolocalizeandimplementSDGs.Anon-exhaustinglistoftopicsofwhichcontributions(alsoincludingcasestudies) mayrefertothe followingproblematicissues:- WhatrolecanperformancegovernanceplayinimplementingtheSDGAgendaatthelocal level?-Howinnovativeperformancegovernancemethodscanboostpolicyinnovationtodealwith super-wickedproblemsatlocallevel?-Howcansuchinnovativeapproachestoperformancegovernancecontributetogenerating consistency between different layers of governance in dealingwithsuper-wickedproblemsto address SDGs?- WhatspecificchallengeslocalizingSDGswouldimply?- Howtolinktheplanningprocessatcontextandorganizationallevelforachievingthelong-termoutcomessetby the 2030 UN Agenda?- HowtooutlinesystemicconnectionsbetweendifferentSDGsandtherelatedstakeholdersto involveincollaborativenetworks?-Howtofosterbottom-upinitiatives, byenhancingtheinterestandparticipationin collaborativenetworksby“grassroot”, “community-based” , andotherkindsoforganizations,asanexpressionofthecivilsocietyparticipativeeffortstogenerate community wellbeing?-Howtoinnovateperformancegovernanceinawaythattheplanningprocessmayembrace intangibles(e.g.: trustandsharedstrategicresources) anddelaysbetweencausesandeffects in policyimplementation?- Howcaninnovativeperformancegovernanceatlocalarealevelenhanceleadershipand learningprocessesincollaborativeplanningforlocalizingandpursuingSDGs?-Howcaninnovativeperformancegovernancecontributetohelppolicymakersinidentifying different outcome layers, theirdrivers, andtheleversonwhichtoactforattainingthetargetedSDGs?- Howtofosterperformancedialogueasafundamentaldriverofbehavioralchangeinsociety tocounteract“irrational discounting”?1ProfessorofPublicManagement Governance-DepartmentofPoliticalSciencesandInternational Relations,UniversityofPalermo,Italy;bianchi.carmine@gmail.com-carmine.bianchi@unipa.it2ChairProfessorandDeanoftheSchoolofInternationalandPublicAffairs,ExecutiveViceDirectorofthe ChinaInstituteofUrbanGovernance,andDirectoroftheCentreforReform,Innovation,andGovernance,ShanghaiJiaoTongUniversity:jnwu@sjtu.edu.cn3ProfessorofPublicAdministrationandDirectorofthePh.D.PrograminPublicAffairsattheUniversityof CentralFlorida(USA):jeremy.hall@ucf.edu4MauriceFalkProfessorofAmericanGovernment,UniversityofPittsburgh(USA):bgpeters@pitt.edu5 DirectorandFounderoftheCentreforInnovationandProductivityinPublicAdministration(PiPPA)at UniversitiSainsMalaysia:musa@usm.myReferencesAnsell,C., Gash, A. (2018). Collaborativeplatformsasagovernancestrategy, JournalofPublic AdministrationResearchandTheory,28, 1,16–32.Bardach, E.(2008). Policy dynamics. In R. E. Goodin, M. Rein M. Moran (Eds.), Oxford handbookofpublicpolicy(pp. 336–366). Oxford UK: Oxford University PressBianchi, C. (2021). Fosteringsustainablecommunityoutcomesthroughpolicynetworks: Adynamic performancegovernanceapproach. InHandbookofcollaborativepublicmanagement. EdwardElgar Publishing.Bianchi,C. (2022). Enhancingpolicydesignandsustainablecommunityoutcomesthrough collaborativeplatformsbasedonadynamicperformancemanagementandgovernanceapproach.InResearchHandbookofPolicyDesign(pp. 407-429). Edward Elgar Publishing.Bryson,J., Crosby, B., Stone, M. (2006). Thedesignandimplementationofcross-sector collaborations: Propositionsfromtheliterature. Public Administration Review, 66, 1, 44–55.Cashore, B., Bernstein, S., Humphreys, D., Visseren-Hamakers, I., Rietig, K. (2019).Designing stakeholder learning dialogues for effectiveglobalgovernance. PolicyandSociety, 38(1), 118- 147.Douglas, S. andAnsell, C. (2021). Getting a grip on the performance of collaborations: Examining collaborativeperformanceregimesandcollaborativeperformance summits, Public Administration Review, 81,5, 951–961.GeneralAssembly(2015). ResolutionadoptedbytheGeneralAssemblyon25 September2015.Transformingourworld: the2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. A/RES/70/1 25 September 2015. NewYork: UnitedNations.Folke, C., Colding, J., Berkes, F. (2003). Synthesis: buildingresilienceandadaptivecapacityin social-ecologicalsystems. Navigatingsocial-ecologicalsystems: Buildingresilienceforcomplexity andchange, 9(1),352-387.Foster, C., Louie, J. (2010). Evaluatingcommunityorganizing. CenterforEvaluationInnovation.https://www. Evaluationinnovation. org/publication/evaluating-community-organizing.Kania, J., Kramer, M. (2011). Collectiveimpact. StanfordSocialInnovationReview.Winter 2011. PaloAlto, CA.Laihonen, H. andMäntylä, S. (2017). Principles of performance dialogue in public administration, InternationalJournalofPublicSector Management, 30, 5, 414–428.Levin,K., Cashore, B., Bernstein, S., Auld, G. (2012). Overcomingthetragedyofsuperwicked problems: constrainingourfutureselves to ameliorate global climate change. Policy sciences, 45(2), 123- 152.Moynihan, D. (2008). The Dynamics of Performance Management. Washington, DC: Georgetown UniversityPress.Moore,S., Winders, J., Fröhling, O., Jones III, J. P., Roberts, S. M. (2007). Mapping the grassroots:NGOformalisationinOaxaca, Mexico. JournalofInternationalDevelopment: TheJournalofthe DevelopmentStudiesAssociation, 19(2), 223-237.Osborne, S. P. (2010). Conclusions Public governance and public services delivery: a research agendaforthefuture. TheNewPublicGovernance?,New York, NY: Routledge.Ostrom, E. (1999). Copingwithtragediesofthecommons.Annualreviewofpoliticalscience, 2(1),493-535.Otley, D. (1999). Performance management: A framework for management control systems research,ManagementAccounting Research, 10, 10, 363–382.Perry,B. G., Patel, Z., NorénBretzer, Y., Polk, M. (2018). Organizingforco-production: Local interactionplatformsforurbansustainability. PoliticsandGovernance, 6(1).Perry,B., Diprose, K., TaylorBuck, N., Simon, D. (2021). LocalizingtheSDGsinEngland:Challenges and value propositions for local government. Frontiers in Sustainable Cities, 3.Provan,K. G., Milward, H. B. (2001). Donetworksreallywork? Aframeworkforevaluating public‐sectororganizational networks. Public administration review, 61(4), 414-423.Smith,D. H. (1999). TheeffectivegrassrootsassociationII: Organizationalfactorsthatproduce external impact. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, 10(1), 103- 116.Sørensen, E., Torfing, J. (2012). Introduction: Collaborativeinnovationinthepublicsector. The Innovation Journal, 17(1), 1- 14.Sørensen, E., Torfing, J. (2017). Metagoverning collaborativeinnovationingovernancenetworks.TheAmericanReviewofPublicAdministration, 47(7), 826-839.Stokols,D., Lejano, R. P., Hipp, J. (2013). Enhancingtheresilienceofhuman-environment systems: Asocial ecological perspective. Ecology and Society, 18(1).Tan,D. T., Siri, J. G., Gong, Y., Ong, B., Lim, S. C., MacGillivray, B. H., Marsden, T. (2019).SystemsapproachforlocalisingtheSDGs: co-productionofplace-basedcasestudies. Globalization andHealth, 15(1), 1- 10.Please also CC aapaoffice@163.com when submitting to this panel.

    2022.10.20
  • *Panel Call for Papers 1: Artificial Intelligence and Urban Governance

    Panel at 2022 Asian Association of Public Administration Annual ConferenceShanghai, December 3-4, 2022Full Paper Deadline: November 1, 2022Artificial Intelligence and Urban GovernanceIn the past decade, the rapid development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has driven tremendous changes in the economy, society, and government (Giest Klievink, 2022). In cities, the adoption and application of AI mayhave changed the lifestyles of citizens, the roles and functions of government, and the activities of corporations and NGOs. Manyresearchers havenoticedthe chances and challenges of AI in urban governance. For specific areas, the algorithms recently developed in AI areas raise the performance of city public spending (Valle-Cruz et al., 2022), public services (O'Malley 2014), citizens’ satisfaction and support (Chatterjee et al., 2021; Stukal et al., 2022)and so on. The use of smart tools also poses risks and challenges to governments and other participants in urban governance, especially in the areas of public policy (Valle-Cruz et al., 2020), public order and law (Nunn, 2020), privacy protection (Saura et al., 2022), public value (Andrews, 2019), and AI ethics (Taeihagh, 2021). The ethical and legal concerns of AI applications have attracted fierce discussion. However, there are still important questions to be investigated and solved. Research remains negligible about the (potential) changes in public service demand and supply, relationships, transactions, and interactions among governance partners brought by AI. Many experimentations of AI governance in both developed and developing countries also bring great opportunities to analyze the effects and mechanisms of AI application, and cross-country and cross-city comparative studies are urgently needed.Despite much philosophical and ethical discussion on AI governance, more empirical studies are needed to identify the changes, effects, opportunities, and risks brought by AI. The role of AI remains to be explored in facing new governance challenges and achieving sustainable development goals.This panel aspires to identify new research landscapes and build conscious research agendas for AI and urban governance. Research topics of interest include, but are not limited to:ØAI and citizens•Citizen rights, values, and diversity •Citizen-centric services•Trust in public authorities•Privacy protection ØAI in city governments •Policy making, implementation, and evaluation•Bureaucracy and the structure of bureaucracies•Personnel management•Threat intelligence and securityØAI inNGOs and private sector organizations•Organizational development and service supply•Intersectoral collaborations•Relationships and interactions between the state and social actors.ØAI incity public services•Health, education, and social welfare•Public security and society stability•Transportation and urban planning•Emergency services•Public service delivery ØAI for sustainable development•Environment protection and global warming•Reducingpoverty and hunger •healthier and more sustainable citiesØTheories about AI in governance•Differentconceptsof AI in governance•The development history of AI in governance•AI applications andstakeholder’s relation•Fairness and inequality of AI useResearch presented at this organized panel might be considered for publication by Policy Politicsand Urban Governance. Both journals will leave it to authors to decide where they think their article would best fit with different journal aims and scope. Authors are strongly advised to click on the journal titles above to read their editorial statements before submitting, to ensure their article is of relevance to the journal. All manuscripts submitted to the two journals would be subject to the standard peer review process.Yu Zeng, Shanghai Jiao Tong University,Email: zengyuipa@sjtu.edu.cnLiang Ma, Reming University of China, Email: liangma@ruc.edu.cnJiannan Wu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Email:jnwu@sjtu.edu.cn Simon Marvin,University of Sheffield, Email: s.marvin@sheffield.ac.ukLing Zhu University of Houston Email: lzhu4@central.uh.eduReferenceAndrews, L. (2019). Public administration, public leadership, and the construction of public value in the age of the algorithm and ‘big data.’ Public Administration, 97(2), 296–310. https://doi.org/10.1111/padm.12534Chatterjee, S., Khorana, S., Kizgin, H. (2021). Harnessing the Potential of Artificial Intelligence to Foster Citizens’ Satisfaction: An empirical study on India. Government Information Quarterly, 101621. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.giq.2021.101621Giest, S. N., Klievink, B. (2022). More than a digital system: How AI is changing the role of bureaucrats in different organizational contexts. Public Management Review, 1–20. https://doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2022.2095001Nunn, R. (2020). Discrimination in the Age of Algorithms. In W. Barfield (Ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of the Law of Algorithms(1st ed., pp. 182–198). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108680844.010O’Malley, M. (2014). Doing What Works: Governing in the Age of Big Data. Public Administration Review, 74(5), 555–56.Saura, J. R., Ribeiro-Soriano, D., Palacios-Marqués, D. (2022). Assessing behavioral data science privacy issues in government artificial intelligence deployment. Government Information Quarterly, 101679. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.giq.2022.101679Stukal, D., Sanovich, S., Bonneau, R., Tucker, J. A. (2022). Why Botter: How Pro-Government Bots Fight Opposition in Russia. American Political Science Review, 116(3), 843–857. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055421001507Taeihagh, A. 2021. Governance of artificial intelligence. Policy and Society,40(2), 137-157.Valle-Cruz, D., Criado, J. I., Sandoval-Almazán, R., Ruvalcaba-Gomez, E. A. (2020). Assessing the public policy-cycle framework in the age of artificial intelligence: From agenda-setting to policy evaluation. Government Information Quarterly, 37(4), 101509. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.giq.2020.101509Valle-Cruz, D., Fernandez-Cortez, V., Gil-Garcia, J. R. (2022). From E-budgeting to smart budgeting: Exploring the potential of artificial intelligence in government decision-making for resource allocation. Government Information Quarterly, 39(2), 101644. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.giq.2021.101644

    2022.10.20
  • *Deadline Extended until August 26th, 2022 Call for Papers The 2022 Annual Conference of the Asian Association for Public Administration (AAPA)

    Deadline Extended until August 26th, 2022 Call for PapersThe 2022 Annual Conference of the Asian Association for Public Administration (AAPA)December 3-4th, 2022, Shanghai, ChinaNew Governance Challenges towards Sustainable Development Goals in Asia and the World The world has been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has had profound impacts on individuals, organizations, and societies. As a result, countries are now facing major setbacks in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Though many countries and many cities are gradually recovering from the pandemic, COVID-19’s impacts may be long-lasting. To cope with the challenges, each country and each city may have to adapt their strategies and governance and introduce innovative solutions.Governments around the world now face a set of open-ended problems which are complex, have multiple objectives, and require decision makers to balance competing interests and optimize benefits. How to plan cities so that public services become more equitable and affordable for all? How to enhance the capacity of officials and the performance of government? How can emerging technologies be used to solve these problems in different countries and cities? Decisions related to these issues will affect the lives of billions of people and shape the future of nations and our planet.The conference focuses on developing theories, identifying good practices, and presenting new evidence regarding addressing challenges en route to achieving the SDGs. Both academicians and practitioners from Asia and other parts of the world are welcome to submit papers and panels to present your research, debate ideas, and discuss emerging issues, trends and challenges, as well as your solutions in public administration policy and other fields. Through this event, we hope to develop and reflect on solutions and pathways for recovering from the pandemic and achieving the SDGs under new circumstances, create new theories of governance, and facilitate the exchange of intersectional and international knowledge.Listed below are some non-exclusive sub-themes for your consideration:New theories of governance for Sustainable Development GoalsReducing poverty and hunger while promoting diversity, equity, and inclusionNonprofit/NGO and volunteerismduring times of crisisInnovative modes of public service delivery and administrative reformInnovation in intergovernmental, inter-jurisdictional, and regional collaborationCOVID-19 responses to promote healthier and more sustainable citiesUrban and community resilience for sustainable developmentValue co-creation/co-destruction for promoting/hindering sustainable developmentThe use of emerging technologies to reshape society and governanceDigital governance and smart solutions to the COVID-19 outbreakNew theories and case studies from mega-city and rural governanceThe 2022 AAPA Annual Conference will be jointly hosted by the Asian Association for Public Administration (AAPA) and China Institute for Urban Governance, School of International and Public Affairs at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in collaboration with the International Institute of Administrative Sciences(IIAS) and the International Public Policy Association (IPPA). The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) will participate in and support the event through UNPAN and the Secretariat.SUBMISSION GUIDANCEIndividual paper abstracts (limited to one page in length): All abstracts should include: (1) the name, title, institutional affiliation, address, and a short bio of each contributing author; (2) email address; (3) paper title and its sub-theme; and (4) abstract including references. Proposed papers should present high-quality theoretical, qualitative, or quantitative research.Panel proposals: Each panel will include 4-5 presenters for a session. Panel proposals should include: (1) session title; (2) the institutional affiliations, addresses and short bios of the chair and the discussants; and (3) panelists and panel abstracts. We particularly encourage panel submissions on cross-country or cross-region comparative studies. Submissions should be characterized by a comparative perspective in their theoretical, geographic, methodological, or disciplinary focus. Panel organizers are encouraged to promote its own panel call.All proposals are subject to peer review and should be submitted through http://aapa2022.mikecrm.com/EkZJyFs. Acceptance and rejection notices will be sent out by email. Selected early-career scholars will have the opportunity to participate in a Young Scholar Paper Seminar on research design in September for free.IMPORTANT DATESAbstract/Panel Proposal Submission Deadline: August 26th, 2022 (Extended)Notification of Acceptance/Rejection: End of August, 2022Young Scholar Paper Seminar: September 10th, 2022Final Paper Submission Deadline: November 1st, 2022Online Registration Deadline: November 1st, 2022Conference Check-in: December 2nd, 2022Conference Date: December 3rd - 4th, 2022All presenters must register for the conference in order to have their presentations scheduled in the conference program.REGISTRATION FEESThere is no registration fee for either online or on-site participation (if the pandemic situation allows). On-site participants are expected to cover their own travel cost and local expenses. More detailed information on the conference registration will be available at http://aapa.asia/ in October, 2022.CONFERENCE VENUE ACCOMMODATIONSThe main conference and parallel sessions will be held at Xuhui Campus of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, located at 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai, China. More detailed information on the conference venue and accommodations will be available at XXX in due course.PUBLICATIONS1. After acceptance, authors will be contacted and invited to submit manuscripts to developed journals including Policy Politics,Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis (JCPA), International Review of Administrative Sciences (IRAS), Public Administration and Policy (PAP), Urban Governance (UG). Guest editors of each journal might organize closed-door workshops to provide guidance on how to refine research designs and prepare for peer reviews.2. Distinguished journal editors will be invited to advise young scholars at the Young Scholar Paper Seminar (September 10th, 2022) and the Editor Forum session during the conference.AWARDSThe Best Paper Award will be presented to the author(s) selected by the academic committee to have written the best paper appearing in this conference. To be considered for the award, the author(s) must submit a full manuscript and complete the online registration by the due date.ACADEMIC COMMITTEEChair: Xufeng Zhu, Tsinghua UniversityCommittee Members:Ed Araral, National University of SingaporeBin Chen, CUNY the Graduate CenterMingwang Cheng, Tongji UniversityPobsook Chamchong, Chiang Mai UniversityVeerayuth Chokchaimadoln, Rangsit UniversityNguyen Manh Cuong, Hanoi UniversityMehmet Akif Demircioglu, National University of SingaporeEnxin Gao, East China Normal UniversityJie Gao, National University of SingaporeHai Guo, Florida International UniversityJingwei He, Education University of Hong KongSounman Hong, Yonsei UniversityLing Jiang, Central University of Finance and EconomicsShunsuke Kimura, Meiji UniversityHiroko Kudo, Chuo UniversityBingqin Li, University of New South WalesYanliu Lin, Utrecht UniversityBingsheng Liu, Chongqing UniversityZhilin Liu, Tsinghua UniversityLiang Ma, Renming University of ChinaFanrong Meng, Xi’an Jiaotong UniversityHaozhi Pan, Shanghai Jiao Tong UniversitySungmin Park, Sungkyunkwan UniversityRui Sun, California State University Dominguez HillsAdor Torneo, De La Salle UniversityHuangming Wang, Dalian University of TechnologyJue Wang, Nanyang Technological UniversityXuejun Wang, Lanzhou UniversityZheng Wang, the University of SheffieldYihan Xiong, Fudan UniversityLihua Yang, Beijing UniversityLijing Yang, Nanjing UniversityLin Ye, Sun Yat-sen UniversityHongtao Yi, Ohio State UniversityJingjing Zeng, Zhongnan University of Economics and LawYueping Zheng, Sun Yat-sen UniversityLing Zhu, University of HoustonCONTACTTo get more information about the conference and AAPA, please visit http://aapa.asia/. If you have other questions, comments, or concerns regarding conference submissions, please contact aapaoffice@163.com.

    2022.08.12
  • Call for Papers for the 2022 Annual Conference of the Asian Association for Public Administration (AAPA) Now Issued!

    Call for PapersThe 2022 Annual Conference of the Asian Association for Public Administration (AAPA)December 3-4th, 2022, Shanghai, ChinaNew Governance Challenges towards Sustainable Development Goals in Asia and the World The world has been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has had profound impacts on individuals, organizations, and societies. As a result, countries are now facing major setbacks in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Though many countries and many cities are gradually recovering from the pandemic, COVID-19’s impacts may be long-lasting. To cope with the challenges, each country and each city may have to adapt their strategies and governance and introduce innovative solutions.Governments around the world now face a set of open-ended problems which are complex, have multiple objectives, and require decision makers to balance competing interests and optimize benefits. How to plan cities so that public services become more equitable and affordable for all? How to enhance the capacity of officials and the performance of government? How can emerging technologies be used to solve these problems in different countries and cities? Decisions related to these issues will affect the lives of billions of people and shape the future of nations and our planet.The conference focuses on developing theories, identifying good practices, and presenting new evidence regarding addressing challenges en route to achieving the SDGs. Both academicians and practitioners from Asia and other parts of the world are welcome to submit papers and panels to present your research, debate ideas, and discuss emerging issues, trends and challenges, as well as your solutions in public administration policy and other fields. Through this event, we hope to develop and reflect on solutions and pathways for recovering from the pandemic and achieving the SDGs under new circumstances, create new theories of governance, and facilitate the exchange of intersectional and international knowledge.Listed below are some non-exclusive sub-themes for your consideration:New theories of governance for Sustainable Development GoalsReducing poverty and hunger while promoting diversity, equity, and inclusionNonprofit/NGO and volunteerismduring times of crisisInnovative modes of public service delivery and administrative reformInnovation in intergovernmental, inter-jurisdictional, and regional collaborationCOVID-19 responses to promote healthier and more sustainable citiesUrban and community resilience for sustainable developmentValue co-creation/co-destruction for promoting/hindering sustainable developmentThe use of emerging technologies to reshape society and governanceDigital governance and smart solutions to the COVID-19 outbreakNew theories and case studies from mega-city and rural governanceThe 2022 AAPA Annual Conference will be jointly hosted by the Asian Association for Public Administration (AAPA) and China Institute for Urban Governance, School of International and Public Affairs at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in collaboration with the International Institute of Administrative Sciences(IIAS). The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) will participate in and support the event through UNPAN and the Secretariat.SUBMISSION GUIDANCEIndividual paper abstracts (limited to one page in length): All abstracts should include the following information: (1) the name, title, institutional affiliation, address, and a short bio of each contributing author; (2) email address; (3) paper title and its sub-theme; and (4) abstract including references. Proposed papers should present high-quality theoretical, qualitative, or quantitative research.Panel proposals: Each panel will include 4-5 presenters for a 2-hour session and panel proposals should include: (1) the session title; (2) the institutional affiliations, addresses and short bios of the chair and the discussants; and (3) panelists and panel abstracts. We particularly encourage the submission of panel proposals on cross-country and cross-region comparative studies. Each panel will be encouraged to promote its own panel call so that the comparative studies can be enlarged as more as possible.Paper abstracts and panel proposals will be reviewed and letters of acceptance will be sent to authors by email. Selected early-career scholars will have the opportunity to participate in a capacity building seminar on research design in September for free.All proposals should be submitted through the following link:http://aapa2022.mikecrm.com/EkZJyFsIMPORTANT DATESAbstract/Panel Proposal Submission Deadline: August 15th, 2022Notification of Acceptance/Rejection to Authors: End of August, 2022Young Scholar Paper Seminar: September 10th, 2022Final Paper Submission Deadline and Online Registration: November 1st, 2022Conference Check-in: December 2th, 2022Conference Date: December 3th -4th, 2022All presenters must register for the conference in order to have their presentation scheduled in the conference program.REGISTRATION FEESThere is no registration fee for both online and on-site participation (if the pandemic situation allows). On-site participants are expected to cover their own travel cost and local expenses. More detailed information on the Online Registration will be available in October of 2022.CONFERENCE VENUE and ACCOMMODATIONSThe main conference and the parallel sessions will be held at Xuhui Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai. More detailed information about the conference venue and accommodations will be available in due course.PUBLICATIONS1. The authors of accepted papers in this conference will be contacted and invited to submit manuscripts to some developed journals. Guest editors of the symposiums are encouraged to organize closed-door workshops to polish research designs and prepare peer reviews for each journal.2. We will invite distinguished journal editors to address the issues of paper submission and research design by young scholars at the Young Scholar Paper Seminar (September 3, 2022) and the Editor Forum (December 3 and 4, 2022).AWARDSThe AAPA President will present the Best Paper Award to the author(s) who deliver the best papers(s) selected by a committee. To be considered for awards, the author(s) must submit the full paper to the conference organizer by the due date and complete the registration form.CONTACTTo get more information about the conference and AAPA, please visit http://aapa.asia/ If you have other questions, comments, or concerns regarding conference submissions, please contact aapaoffice@163.com.

    2022.06.22
Asian Association for Public Administration (AAPA) 아시아행정학회(亞細亞行政學會)

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